education philosopher

Megan McArdle, Global Warming, and Accepting Authority

Posted in Uncategorized by KevinCK on November 23, 2015

This weekend, I did a google search looking for a particular article by a favorite journalist of mine, Megan McArdle. Something came up in my Google search that looked interesting enough to click on, a blurb on thinkprogress.org claiming that McArdle has admitted to having “outsourced her thinkning on global warming to the Cato Institute…”

Here’s the quote that thinkprogress believes is the smoking gun:

The first reason I don’t post a lot [on global warming] is that I’m not an expert, and I’m not planning to become one.  I’ve basically outsourced my opinion on the science to people like Jonathan Adler, Ron Bailey, and Pat Michaels of Cato–all of whom concede that anthropogenic global warming is real, though they may contest the likely extent, or desired remedies.

That doesn’t seem to me like the shocker thinkprogress wants it to be. They no doubt want to tarnish McArdle because she is what they’d consider a conservative journalist, and Cato is what they’d consider a conservative think-tank.

When you follow the link to McArdle’s actual article, she is aware that outfits like thinkprogress will consider her “admission” a cop-out. So, she offers this defense:

[H]ere’s the thing: I cannot be an expert on everything.  I don’t know what the speed limit should be, how we should redesign the military to counter 21st century threats, or the best way to allocate scarce water resources between competing claims, even though I recognize that in a modern society, these are all the proper concerns of the government; even though I think that these questions are important, I am willing to leave them to experts on traffic patterns, national defense, and water rights. So with global warming.  Time spent brushing up on the science is time spent not reading up on things where I have greater comparative advantage, like tax policy or the budget.

Okay, I don’t know about you, but that sounds stunningly reasonable to me, much more so than thinkprogress’s shocking headline spins it. And to be honest, this is one reason why I think we are hypocritical when we tell people that they shouldn’t accept authority, but always think for themselves. (more…)

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William James and Libertarianism

Posted in Uncategorized by KevinCK on November 8, 2015

I came to William James about 10 years after I came to a libertarian understanding of politics and the world. Thus, I know that the work of James did not lead me to libertarianism and doubt that libertarianism affected my subsequent appreciation of the works of William James. But since I’ve been a libertarian in political outlook for about the last 20 years, and I consistently fin William James to be one of the most edifying philosophers, I sometimes wonder if the two are congruent with each other.

On its face, it seems like there wouldn’t be. Libertarianism is a political ideology that puts human liberty at its core, and the William Jamestype of libertarianism I subscribe to believes that political/social arrangements achieve liberty best when there is minimal government and the rest is left to voluntary arrangements (by markets or other means). William James was a philosopher/psychologist with a wide range of concerns, none overtly political; he spawned a (variation on) a pragmatic theory of truth, crafted a theory of experience called radical empiricism, and wrote on other topics. But never, from what I can tell, politics.

But there are at least two ways I can see the works of William James being congruent and fitting quite nicely with a libertarian worldview. First, as wide-ranging as James’s work was, his philosophic projects always placed individuality at its core. (more…)

A Jamesian Reason for Loving the Philosophy of William James

Posted in Uncategorized by KevinCK on November 2, 2015

There are a few philosophers whose work I find myself rereading every year or so. John Stuart Mill is on that list. Friedrich Hayek is on that list. But William James, the American pragmatist, is at the very top of that list. More than any other philosopher, I think that William James really got and conveyed the complexities of life and human experience. At the heart of his pragmatic thought is the idea that humans struggle with tasks like ascertaining truth and navigating the external world without the ability to access the outside world independently of our subjective experience of it. We can imagine what the world is objectively like, and we can find out new things about that world, but we can never quite get beyond subjective experience.

Because that is roughly James’s starting point, James also puts a lot of weight on the idea that when we see the world, we are doing more than seeing the data – we are interpreting the data almost while we see it. When I see my office, I don’t just experience sense data, but interpret that data such that I see it as my office (an interpretation) with my computer (an interpretation), the chair I sit in while using the computer (an interpretation), etc. Interpretation and subjective experience is a part of the way reality is presented to me; I can’t see the world “as it is” because subjective experience is always part of, well, my experience.

What does this have to do with anything? Last night, I was reading a beautiful essay by William James called The Sentiment of Rationality. Here, he explores the emotional side of philosophy. Yes, we may accept a philosophy more or less because we think it explains what it seeks to explain well, but there seems an unavoidably emotional side to why we gravitate toward one philosophy over others.  (more…)